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Brian: vocational education teacher, Broadmeadows

Brian: vocational education teacher, Broadmeadows

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VIDEO: Graphic on screen: Brian Martin Teacher/ Cultural Developer and Trainer Kangan Institute
Brian Martin standing in the classroom.

VIDEO: Brian Martin standing in the classroom.

Graphic on screen: Teacher/ Cultural Developer and Trainer Brian Martin Kangan Institute Broadmeadows

AUDIO: My name is Brian Martin, I work for the Indigenous Education Centre at Kangan Institute. I design Aboriginal cultural awareness training programs.

VIDEO: Brian Martin teaching in the classroom.

AUDIO: (Brian Martin speaking to students) Um, just to quickly outline what we’re doing today; this is a participant guide which is on your table, that’s for you to keep.

VIDEO: Brian Martin standing in the classroom.

AUDIO: Originally I did a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Sydney University and then I went on to do a Graduate Diploma of Vocational Education and Training.

VIDEO: Brian Martin teaching in the classroom.

AUDIO: Which enables you to teach within the TAFE system. Skills you need to be a teacher; initially and fundamentally you need a great knowledge of your subject area. So, it’s important that if I’m teaching art that I’m current.

VIDEO: Brian Martin meeting with colleagues and writing on a whiteboard.

AUDIO: The good thing about that is there are professional development things in the TAFE system; opportunities to return to industry. If you’re up to date with what you do then you’re giving the best possible standard to students. And that’s what the TAFE system’s about.

VIDEO: Brian Martin teaching in the classroom.

AUDIO: You need good people and facilitation skills. Patience.

VIDEO: Brian Martin and students laughing in the classroom.

AUDIO: A sense of humour is good. Humour is a great way to impart knowledge. That’s how people remember things. I think if you have a passion for what you’re doing then that comes through in the classroom, that’s where students become a lot more sort of enthusiastic, so that’s important.

VIDEO: Brian Martin writing on a whiteboard in the classroom.

AUDIO: The week where I teach is diverse, it’s never the same. Of course you’ve got to get to the classroom at least a half hour to an hour before students arrive. Making sure everything’s prepared. You know, you’ve got your photocopying done and whatever you need to have done for the class. The other preparation or other after-class events like assessing work, marking and following up students and so there’s a whole different range of things that you do outside the classroom for that class to happen.

VIDEO: Brian Martin teaching in the classroom.

AUDIO: I think, initially, teaching can be daunting but once you’ve got the first six months or the first year under your belt, what happens is teaching becomes quite easy. Not the act of teaching but the record-keeping, the lesson plans. As times goers on your preparation times a lot shorter because you’re very experienced. My favourite part of being a teacher would be, no class is the same. That’s what makes teaching exciting because it’s not boring.

VIDEO: Students watching and listening to Brian Martin in the classroom.

AUDIO: It’s very rewarding in the way that you can change someone’s life. That might come back years later when you meet a student who says ‘Yeah, I remember your class. You said this to me and this changed me.’

VIDEO: Brian Martin standing in the classroom.

AUDIO: It’s those sorta things that make it worthwhile. That you can actually have a major effect on people’s lives.

VIDEO: (fade to black)
Graphic on screen: State Government Victoria Insignia
Department of Education and Early Childhood Development
© State of Victoria 2012

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